700 species are negatively impacted by climate change

A new study has found that nearly half (47%) of the mammals and nearly a quarter (24.4%) of the birds on the IUCN Red List of threatened species are negatively impacted by climate change: a total of about 700 species. Previous assessments had said only 7% of listed mammals and 4% of birds were impacted. … Continue reading 700 species are negatively impacted by climate change

Concerns over first snow and common leopards found in same area

From the BBC Environment and Science News The first ever recorded video footage showing snow leopards and common leopards sharing the same habitat on the Tibetan plateau is causing concern among conservationists. They are worried about the future of the snow leopard’s habitat if common leopards begin to live at higher elevations in a warming … Continue reading Concerns over first snow and common leopards found in same area

WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner ~ 18 December 2016

WildCat Conservation Legal Aid Society ~ WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner Our weekly podcast provides a recap of the week’s top news stories affecting all wildcats around the world. The series also highlights work performed by WCCLAS, featured interviews, commentaries and special reports. Top News Stories for Sunday, 18 December 2016: … Continue reading WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner ~ 18 December 2016

CITES COP 17 convenes in just six days during which the world’s governments will make vital decisions regarding wildlife

The 17th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora is taking place in in Johannesburg, South Africa from September 24th to October 5, 2016. WildCat Conservation Legal Aid Society received official approval in May from the Department of Interior, U.S. Fish … Continue reading CITES COP 17 convenes in just six days during which the world’s governments will make vital decisions regarding wildlife

One-tenth of the Earths’ wilderness destroyed in just two decades

A new study published last week in Current Biology: Catastrophic Declines in Wilderness Areas Undermine Global Environment Targets, by James Watson et al. and reviewed in Science asserts that we’ve destroyed one-tenth of the Earths wilderness in just two decades. Conservation certainly includes protecting declining wild fauna and flora, however, Watson thinks we’re missing the … Continue reading One-tenth of the Earths’ wilderness destroyed in just two decades

WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner ~ 18 September 2016

WildCat Conservation Legal Aid Society ~ WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner Our weekly podcast provides a recap of the week’s top news stories affecting all wildcats around the world. The series also highlights work performed by WCCLAS, featured interviews, commentaries and special reports. Top News Stories for Sunday, 18 September 2016: … Continue reading WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner ~ 18 September 2016

WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner ~ August 21, 2016

WildCat Conservation Legal Aid Society ~ WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner Our weekly podcast provides a recap of the week’s top news stories affecting all wildcats around the world. The series also highlights work performed by WCCLAS, featured interviews, commentaries and special reports. Top News Stories for Sunday, August 21, 2016: … Continue reading WildCat News Brief Podcast ~ with host Alex Warner ~ August 21, 2016

The threats of old are still the dominant drivers of current species loss

In an article appearing in Nature this week, Sean Maxwell and colleagues examine the causes for species decline through the analysis of IUCN Red List data in “Biodiversity: The ravages of guns, nets and bulldozers.” According to Maxwell et al, the top big killers are attributable to overexploitation including logging, hunting, fishing, plant gathering and … Continue reading The threats of old are still the dominant drivers of current species loss